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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 14:17   #1
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Más de 3.000 posts, señora. Qué le parece
 
Fecha de Ingreso: 08-October-2004
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vía https://www.instagram.com/helms3dmj/

Las dos primeras imágenes son las que forman la famosa miniatura de peKerMaN http://foro.musclecoop.com/showpost....&postcount=602

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Ronald Walker (top left): English amateur weightlifter born in 1909, pictured here in his prime in the early 1930’s, Ronald was an expert in a variety of dumbbell and barbell lifts and put up some impressive numbers across a range of movements. While his 297.5lbs snatch and clean and jerk of 363.75lbs at 5’11 190lbs were nothing to sneeze at, his overhead press of 282.5lbs and his single arm deadlift of 441lbs really display his raw strength. Unfortunately he would die of cancer in 1948.

Otto Arco (right top and right bottom): Polish strongman and champion wrestler born in 1882, Otto was 138lbs at 5’2 in his prime. He was a hand balancer, “muscle control” performer (like Maxick he practiced contracting his muscles in coordinated and rhythmic ways), acrobatics and weightlifting. In these early 1900’s pictures you can see his incredible development and leanness, and he could clean and jerk 280lbs, incredible at this body weight in that era.

George Jowett (bottom left): Born in England in 1891, George was injured as a child and was expected to never walk again or live into adulthood. Miraculously, he not only walked and lived into adulthood but became a boxing, wrestling and weightlifting champion as a teenager and a prominent bodybuilder and strongman as an adult in the early 1900’s. His many impressive lifts and bodybuilding titles would be enough to secure a legacy, but he also went on to publish books, magazines and courses on training, helped to establish weightlifting in the AAU and even advised both Bob Hoffman and Joe Weider in the earliest days of their careers.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BiC1nVlh69g/


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Follow up from last week, now for all my sisters in Iron, with the same message. These photos are all from 1890-1930: top row - left and middle, Katie Sandwina (Katharina Brumbac) the legendary strong woman who at 6 foot 200lbs with an incredibly muscular posterior chain, shown here causally carrying three men, once bested Eugene Sandow in a one arm overhead contest. Far right top, Luisita Leers (Luise Krökel) with incredible muscularity considering she was an acrobat and trapeze artist not a lifter.

Middle - Ivy Russell who deadlifted 410.5lbs/186.2kg in 1930 at 134lbs/60.8kg! For reference the heaviest deadlifts pulled at the 2017 IPF unequipped Worlds were 187.5 at 57kg and 200kg at 63kg, making this a world class deadlift by even today’s standards with a MUCH larger population AND participation by women in sport today.

Bottom Row - far left, Vulcana (Kate Roberts Williams) turn of the century Welsh strong woman who bent pressed weights in the 120-145lbs range. Middle bottom row, Charmion (Laverie Valee) turn of the century vaudeville trapeze and strong woman performer with an incredible physique, also primarily not a weight lifter! Far right, Athleta Van Huffelen a strong woman weightlifter and wrestler from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s who managed 204lbs overhead with one arm, and had 16 inch arms!
https://www.instagram.com/p/BhFDPgvB9g4/


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Bill Good was the strongest among the three “Good brothers” who were lifters from Pennsylvania. Bill Good won seven Senior National Weightlifting Titles (1930-1937) and competed in both the 1932 and 1936 Olympics as a light heavyweight (82.5kg/181.5lbs and under). He had a thick and proportionate physique and was also the first American to Clean & Jerk 350 Pounds.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjaark7h1VV/


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John "The Swiss Mountaineer" Lemm was a Swiss professional wrestler and strongman in the same era as Hackenshmidt, and who was just as physically imposing at 216lbs at 5’8 shown in these photos with impressive leg development. He is credited with having the unofficial heaviest squat on record before the advent of the modern squat rack, training ATG with approximately 500lbs. Remember this was the era when squats weren’t a regular part of training and finding a way to get it into your back was an issue!
https://www.instagram.com/p/BjLGqfehuGp/


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Herman Goerner (top left) the early 1900’s strongman who I have mentioned previously because his deadlift record of 793lbs at 220lbs was untouched for half a century, is shown here in a rare picture that displays his muscularity. He also had incredible grip strength as he one arm deadlifted 602lbs on a straight bar at his strongest.

Unknown picture circa 1900 (top right) I can’t find out who this was, only when it was taken, but I just wanted to post it because the combination of proportions, muscularity and leanness in this era is incredible and looks remarkably like a top tier modern day natural bodybuilder, yet from over 100 years ago.

Charles Vansart (bottom left) known as the man with the iron grip was part of the same circus troupe as Hackenshmidt at one time, and defeated the great strongman “Cyclops” in a battle of grip strength in the early 1900’s by ripping a tennis ball in half. He performed many other feats of hand, grip and forearm strength including bending metal without using his thigh and breaking a champagne botttle wrapped in a towel in the crook of his forearm and bicep by flexing. On top of his impressive grip strength he maintained an incredibly lean physique as shown here.

Pyotyr Krylov (bottom right) known as the king of kettlebells was a russian strongman around the turn of the century with impressive strength and an impressive upper body build, especially his shoulders. At 175 cm (5’9”), his weight peaked at 112 kg (247 lbs) and at his strongest he could military press 120kg (264lbs)...for 5 reps. But probably his most impressive feat ever, which to my knowledge has not yet been replicated is a Kettlebell Crucifix with two 41 kg (90 lbs) kettlbells held out to the sides for a few seconds before he brought them in to press them.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BjAwREdBkmw/



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In honor of Mother’s Day today, I want to post about two women who were “mothers” to the participation of women in the iron game:

I previously highlighted Ivy Russell (left, shown here in the early 1930’s) for her deadlift that would still be considered word class by today’s standards (410.5lbs at 138lbs) but she was also renowned for her impressive lean physique. I mentioned her in a post with many other female iron game legends, but she deserves unique mention, because more important than her personal athletic achievements, she was instrumental, by publishing a letter in Strength and Health magazine urging the head of the British Amateur Weightlifting Association to sanction a meet for women, in the organisation of the first weightlifting competition in the UK in which women could compete in 1932 (which she won). Ivy broke many stereotypes and cultural taboos by displaying her physique, advocating for women’s participation in strength sport and shattering the conceptions of what was thought possible and how heavy weightlifting would affect a women’s body.

Similarly, the legendary Abbye “Pudgy” Stockton would become the first American woman to help organise and compete in the first sanctioned weightlifting meet in the US held in Los Angeles in 1947. In it she pressed 100lbs, snatched 105lbs and clean and jerked 135lbs at a body weight of 118lbs. Abbye also held a physique title and was named by Bernarr Macfadden as “Miss Physical Culture Venus” in 1948 developing an impressive physique half a decade before steroids entered bodybuilding. She trained and posed with the early golden age bodybuilders on muscle beach, wrote a regular column for Strength and Health magazine titled “Barbelles” and was hugely influential as a counter to the stereotypes of the day and was instrumental in opening the doors for female participation in strength and physique sport.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BiuzRaHBQ6I/


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Dick Bachtell (left): shown here in 1936, Dick would grace the covers of Strength and Health Magazine three times in the 1930’s and 40’s due to his impressive development. But, he was primarily a weightlifter and he competed in the featherweight class in the 1932 Olympics and was a USA Senior National Champion in 1929-1931, 1934, 1935, and 1937.

John Garan (right): a well known physical culturist who trained with Siegmund Klein in the early 1900’s, Garan was considered a muscular marvel, being very lean at 5’5 155lbs with 23 inch thighs, and who could squat 300lbs for many reps. Why not tell you his 1RM? There were no squat racks at this time, so you would have to perform a steinborn squat for your first rep to get the bar off the ground for back squats or do a clean if you wanted to front squat at this time, so reps were more common. What’s a steinborn squat you ask? You have to lift the barbell upright so its vertical then crouch down into a squat position next to it while holding onto the bar to keep it steady and lean your traps into the bar while tilting it over onto you for the first rep. Google it and watch someone do it, guaranteed you’ll make this face😳
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bih5Moml0t1/


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All pictures circa 1910-1913 - Max Sick was born on June 28, 1882 in Bergenz Austria, a sickly child plagued by early illness. At 10 years old he began training with weights, but he later would become famous under the name “Maxick” for his “muscle control” acts where he would isolate and flex specific muscles in purposeful patterns and in unique ways. In addition to walking around incredibly lean, shown here with striated glutes, and being an accomplished hand balancer, strongman, and muscle control artist, Maxick was an accomplished weightlifter. He stood 5’3.75″ and weighed between 145 and 147 pounds yet his strength was comparable to many heavyweights. Some of his best lifts were:

Right hand military press – 112 pounds

Right hand snatch – 165 pounds

Right hand jerk (two hands to shoulder one hand jerk) – 240 pounds

Two hands military press – 230 pounds

Two hands clean and jerk – 272 pounds

Two hands continental clean and jerk – 340 pounds

He would compete and perform until the break out of WWI during which time he was voluntarily interned in the UK as he refused to fight in the Axis military. Fortunately his history is well documented as he would publish many training manuals that would remain popular even decades after his career ended.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BhkMbZ0Bn6h/


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George Eiferman, the 1948 Mr America was born in Philadelphia in 1925. On his 17th birthday he joined the Navy, serving during World War II where he would begin weight training. After the conclusion of his military service in 1946, he joined Fritshe's gym in his hometown of Philadelphia. The following year he won the Mr. Philadelphia title, then went on to place 5th at the 1947 Mr America where he would meet and befriend that year’s winner Steve Reeves. However, the next year would be the year where Eiferman made his mark. In 1948 Eiferman placed just behind Jack Delinger in the Mr Western America, won the Mr California title, and then his season culminated with him winning the AAU 1948 Mr. America title.

He then moved to California and began engaging with the public promoting health and fitness. He opened gyms in Hawaii, California and Vegas and spent years traveling the country speaking to high school students at assemblies, promoting fitness as a lifestyle. In 1954 he was recruited by Mae West along with other bodybuilders for her touring nightclub stage show. He would become a popular trainer, gym owner, speaker and even had a local fitness show in Las Vegas in the 1980’s.

Eiferman was impressively strong, he regularly would display his ability to bench press 405lbs, could do 315lbs on the behind the neck press and trained full body three times per week, primarily in the 7-10 rep range. In the lead up to competition, he would increase his frequency of training. He won the Mr America title at 23 years old at 194lbs in the condition shown above at 5’7” (run the FFMI for fun) more than half a decade before bodybuilders would begin using anabolics. He was universally respected as a genuine, kind man, and he gave 22 years of his life to the assembly circuit encouraging youth to exercise. He passed away with his family by his side in 2002.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BmzyMeEl...n-by=helms3dmj


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Steve Reeves, the 1947 Mr America was Born in Glasgow, Montana in 1926. Reeves moved to California at 10 years old with his mother after his father died in a farming accident. Reeves developed an interest in bodybuilding at Castlemont High School after losing an arm wrestling match to a much smaller boy. Thus he started training at Ed Yarick's gym in Oakland, California. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the United States Army during World War II, and served in the Philippines and briefly in Japan after the war’s conclusion.

Upon returning to California after his service, he continued training and won the Mr Pacific Coast in 1946. The next year, he would win it again before going on to secure the Mr America title. He had a stellar bodybuilding career, and by 1950 he had won the Mr World and Mr Universe titles as well before retiring from competition.

From here he would go on to become the Arnold of his era, getting a break in Hollywood and doing 18 movies in the 1950-1960’s, inspiring the next generation of bodybuilders like Ferrigno and Schwarzenegger to try to make it in the movie business as well.

He trained full body three times per week, followed a whole foods based high carbohydrate diet, ate more the day before training sessions, used antagonist paired sets, and used strict form. Once steroids hit the scene in the mid 50’s, shortly after his era ended, he became a vocal proponent for natural bodybuilding and many of us natties probably have him to thank that our community is decently sized today. Steve passed away on May 1, 2000 after a legendary career as having one of the most balanced physiques the world had seen.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bmg8xS7F...n-by=helms3dmj


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In my last historical post about Alan Stephen the 1946 Mr America, we reached the half way point recounting the history of the pre-steroid era 1939-1954 Mr America winners. As an interlude to the sausage fest 😉, I thought it would be cool to highlight the amazing pioneer Joan Rhodes! Born in 1921 in London, her incredible story begins with her parents orphaning her to live on the streets at the age of 14, where she hooked up with traveling performers and learned to be a performing strong woman which would lead to an incredible career in an unlikely era for such success. Shown in the top left in 1951 displaying her muscular physique, she would reach previously unattainable heights of stardom doing performances that were very counter to the culture of her era. She was not only seen as an attractive woman and arguably a sex symbol, but simultaneously as a symbol of strength and athleticism. She would routinely perform feats such as bending bars and then challenge men in the audience to try to replicate the feat and would frequently lift not only full grown men, but in some cases men who were specifically famous for being extremely tall or massive, in some cases supporting the weight of a man weighing over 400lbs! At her peak she was very popular, performing for the Royal family and even performing alongside Bob Hope on the USO tour. She appeared regularly on US and UK television and shared show headlines with the likes of Fred Astaire. She had a rich and long career in entertainment as a strong woman performer and then as an actor, living a long, inspirational life ending at the age of 89, at which point it was estimated she’d torn ~20,000 phone books in half.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BmEdTOdF...n-by=helms3dmj


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Alan Stephan, the 1946 Mr America was born in Cicero, Illinois in 1924, of Lithuanian parents. His name was originally Albert Steponaitis but his family had it changed to Stephan. Alan began training in gymnastics and calisthenics as a young teenager, inspired by other physical culturists of the day. Upon entering high school he began weightlifting and wrestling in addition to gymnastics and calisthenics. While he had more wholistic fitness goals, he had admirable strength and entered a few meets, at his peak he pressed 260, snatched 240, and clean and jerked 325 when he was 19 at a bodyweight of about 205 pounds. After graduating from High School in June of 1943, in July he entered the Navy.

In the navy his physique and fitness caught the attention of the higher ups and he became a model for the Navy's Public Relations Artists, posing for Navy Recruiting Posters, and Warbond Posters. Later, he was assigned as a Judo, Wrestling and Hand to Hand combat instructor, where he would travel the US training sailors in martial arts with minimal time to dedicate to his own weight training.

On April 2 1946 he was discharged from the Navy. Two weeks later he started training for the Mr. America Contest which allowed him just 6 weeks to prep...incredibly at the age of 22, he entered and won the 1946 Mr America title on June 2nd in Detroit which was held in connection with the 1946 National Weight Lifting Championships. Amazingly this was his first physique competition ever. At the time he won he was 5 ft. 11 1/2 in., weighing 205lbs in the condition shown here. Two years after winning the AAU Mr America, Alan would go on to then win the IFBB Mr America becoming the first (and only) man to win both titles.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bl6GlnqF...n-by=helms3dmj


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Clarence “Clancy” Ross the 1945 Mr America, was born in Oakland, California on October 26, 1923, the second of the four children of Hershel Ross, a teamster, and his wife Jeannette Levi. His mother died when he was young, and due to unfortunate events at home he grew up in a series of foster homes. He started weight training at age 17, weighing 135lbs at 5'9"

He joined the US Army Air Forces (previously called the Army Air Corps and the progenitor to the US Air Force to be formed in 1947) shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 at the age of 18. In the Forces Clancy would quickly be assigned as a physical training instructor and he would meet up with Leo Stern. Leo had started a weight lifting club in California that was forced to shutdown after the outbreak of the war. But he took his weightlifting knowledge into the Forces where he helped Clancy develop an impressive physique and Herculean strength.

Leo and Clancy collaborated in innovative ways and their training would shape the style that future bodybuilders would use for generations. The first to popularise incline benching, lat Pulldowns, pull overs and other novel training methods of the era, Clarence was known for his pec development that was rarely seen previously.

Ross was known as “The King of Bodybuilders” but this accolade had less to do with his physique and more to do with his positive influence on the sport. He was known as a charismatic leader and positive representative of physical culture and opened a gym in Walnut Creek that while under a different name, still operates today.

But this is not to say his physique wasn’t worthy of legend. Competing between 185-195lbs Ross won the 1945 AAU Mr. America title in Los Angeles, the 1946 Pro Mr. America, the 1948 Pro Mr. USA (beating Steve Reeves to do so), and the 1949 IFBB North American Championships.

In a comeback in the 50’s, Ross also won the tall class at the 1955 NABBA Pro Mr. Universe in London, and competed for the last time in 1956, finishing second to Bill Pearl in the Pro Mr. USA. He lived a long life, passing away at the age of 84 in 2008.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Blq1UM8h...n-by=helms3dmj


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Steve Stanko born Sep 5, 1917 has an incredible story. He began as a weightlifter, achieving international success very early in life. He won silver in the heavyweight division at the 1938 World Championships in Vienna shortly after turning 21. He continued to improve, and three years later he became the first man to total 1,000lbs with a 310.5lbs snatch, 310.5lbs clean and jerk and a 381lbs press as a heavyweight at 237lbs, totalling 1,002lbs at the Middle Atlantic championships of 1941, an unofficial world record.

Unfortunately Steve also suffered from severe Phlebitis (blood clots in his legs) and was hospitalised shortly afterwards for months. He dropped to under 180lbs during bed rest while he recovered. It wasn’t until the summer of 1942 he would return to training. His training (especially for his legs) was limited due to his condition, but he found a way forward stating that if he could no longer be a weightlifter, he would switch to bodybuilding.

In meteoric fashion he was able to get back to his previous levels of development and in bodybuilding he was also an incredible achiever. He was crowned Mr. America in 1944, and later went on to become the first IWF Mr. Universe in 1947. He was 5’11 and competed at 223lbs in his peak condition as a bodybuilder before bodybuilders were using anabolics (run the FFMI on that for fun).

Sadly, on Dec 31 1978 at age 61 deep vein thrombosis claimed his life but he would leave behind an impressive legacy in two sports.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BlTghUFh...n-by=helms3dmj


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Born July 8, 1917 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jules Bacon would begin lifting weights after he was accidentally shot by a friend in the Glute with a .22! After a doctor’s statement that he would always “be a little on the weak side” he was motivated to take up fitness. Initially training as a gymnast he then took up barbell training to build his legs, eventually becoming well known for his impressive physique. After placing second to John Grimek in the 1941 Mr America, Jules would sit out the 1942 Mr America competition to work on his physique. He triumphantly returned to win the Mr America competition hosted in Los Angeles California in 1943. Jules brought a unique package to the stage, not a a mass monster by even the standards of that time, Jules won the title at 5’7 175lbs with 16″ arms, standing out due to his proportionality and conditioning that was far beyond the norm for his era.

Jules also became a prominent figure in the physical culture community. While he didn’t compete much after winning the title, he guest posed frequently and began working for the York Barbell club in 1941, writing for Strength and Health magazine for more than two decades. He would return to the stage to compete in the Mr Universe competition in 1947, and then the NABBA Pro Mr Universe in 1953 where he placed second to cap off his competitive career. Jules passed away at the age of 89 in 2007 after a highly successful career as an athlete and as a writer, contributing to the culture for decades.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BlGq52vB...n-by=helms3dmj


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While there were 66 competitors who competed for the title in 1941, only 13 competed in the 1942 Mr America. This was not to say that the winner was not deserving, as Frank Leight, the New York City policeman who won, placed second in 1940 behind only John Grimek and third in 1941, behind Grimek and future winner Jules Bacon. After the US entered WW2 in 1941, the Mr America contest was unfortunately much less well attended due to so many of the potential contestants being drafted. As was the standard practice of the day, the national weight lifting championships were held in conjunction with the Mr America contest, this year in Cincinnati, Ohio. The winner Frank Leight, like many contemporaries of his day was well rounded in free weight training and trained for Olympic weightlifting, which at the time often included dumbbell overhead pressing. His training included squats, rows, Jefferson lifts, body weight work, hanging bar work and impressive overhead lifting. He was well known for doing “see saw” overhead dumbbell presses, essentially alternating overhead DB presses, using 110lbs in each hand for reps. He trained at Siegmund Klein’s renowned physical culture gym in New York City where many of the east coast greats of this era trained.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk53cRzh...n-by=helms3dmj


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The Monarch of Muscledom John Grimek is a legend who lives up to his fame. Before he won the 1940 and 1941 AAU Mr America he’d already made his mark as a weightlifter. A naturally large man, he struggled to stay within range of the 82.5kg/182lbs weight class despite being 5’8, having to be very lean to make weight. Often a heavyweight he was also chasing records in the strict press in this light heavyweight class. He bombed out and failed weight cuts a number of times in his pursuit of a light heavy world record press. In many competitions, especially international ones like the 1936 Olympics, he competed as one of the lightest heavyweights in the over 82.5kg class, while Bill Good competed for the US in the 82.5kg class. Grimek, often weighing in in the high 180 to low 190lbs range, was outweighed by close to 100lbs by some of his international heavyweight contemporaries. Unbelievably he still placed 9th in the 36’ Olympics and pressed 253lbs, however at his best Grimek pressed 250lbs as a light heavy (a US record at the time) and 285lbs as a heavyweight (however a lighter heavyweight compared to others). In 1940 he easily won the Mr America, despite the fact that his body weight was suppressed from him attempting to stay light for weightlifting. Competing in the low 190’s at 5’8 in 1940 he had an impressive level of natural muscle mass with an FFMI somewhere in the range of 26-28 depending on how you estimate his body fat. However, the following year in 1941 when he was no longer worried about weightlifting and he allowed his mass to increase, he stepped on stage at ~220lbs in the condition shown on the left, incredibly with a FFMI in the range of 28-30, before anabolic steroids could be affordably manufactured, before they were accessible, and before they were even considered PEDs. So dominating was his performance at the 1941 Mr America that the “Grimek rule” was instituted stating that once you won the title, you couldn’t compete in the competition again, as the AAU believed he would never be beaten. As predicted, Grimek retired undefeated.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bkvacnuh...n-by=helms3dmj


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In June 1939 Bert Goodrich (right) won the America's Best Physique Contest. While this wasn’t the AAU sanctioned true first Mr America contest, Bert is regarded as the first Mr America in spirit. However in fact, the first AAU sanctioned and billed Mr America contest was put on less than a month later and was won by Roland Essmaker (left). These two gentlemen were the first in a long tradition of winners. The Mr America title was considered the pinnacle of Amateur Bodybuilding in the US for decades and from the period of 1939-1954, which I’ll be cataloguing, American bodybuilders were not yet using anabolic steroids.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BkgCWD1h...n-by=helms3dmj


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Miss Ella (left) of the Schiavoni circus troupe was a strong woman and acrobat from the early 1900’s and also performed posing demonstrations to show her muscularity, as you can see here she hits an impressive side triceps before a “side triceps” was a pose.

Mildred Burke (top right) was a wrestler from the 1930-1950’s era. Born Mildred Bliss, she took the ring name Mildred Burke, and started out wrestling men in carnivals in 1935, reportedly she wrestled 200 men only losing once. She was instrumental in opening the sport of wrestling to women and creating a women’s wrestling federation. She was a multi time champion and true pioneer.

Edna Rivers (bottom right) was a pre WWII acrobat and weightlifter who trained with Abbye Stockton on muscle beach. She was incredibly strong, and is shown here deadlifting between 405-505lbs (I’ve seen conflicting reports and visually it’s unclear what the plate values are but anywhere in that range is incredible).
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bj2JN5kB...n-by=helms3dmj


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The Zimmerman brothers Joe (top left) and Dick (right) were York Barbell regulars and lifting enthusiasts in the 30’s and 40’s. On the left is Joe performing a handstand on boxes with a 202-pound Louis Cyr Dumbbell in his teeth (image credit oldtimestrongman.com)! On the right Dick Zimmerman was considered “the new perfect man” for a time by Bob Hoffman and this picture of him appeared on the cover of Bob Hoffman’s Strength and Health Magazine in 1935.

Edward Aston on the bottom left and right was an incredibly strong lifter and grip enthusiast. He beat Maxick for the middle weight World Championship weightlifting title in 1910 and then in 1911 won the title of Britain’s Strongest Man by beating the famed Thomas Inch. He would remain undefeated at his retirement over twenty years later. As a display of his grip strength he once double overhand grip deadlifted 496lbs using a bar with a 2.25 inch diameter.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BjumWkHh...n-by=helms3dmj


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Tommy Kono is a legend you might have heard of. Born in 1930 this Japanese American legend was exposed to Olympic weightlifting while in an American internment camp as a young boy during WWII. Despite such a harsh start and having his civil rights violated by his own country so early in his life, he would stick with Olympic weightlifting and go on to represent his country and become arguably one of the greatest champions the sport has ever seen and also was a remarkable bodybuilder. At the young age of 22, in 1952 Kono would enter his first Olympics winning the 67.5kg and under Gold Medal, snatching 117.5kg, military pressing 105kg and clean and jerking 140kg. He would move up a weight class and win his division in the 1953 World Championships as well. He’s shown here on the platform in Helsinki at the 1952 Olympics and also posing in the warm up room in the 1953 World Championships. Seeing his physique you can understand why he would go on to win the Mr World title in 1954. If you follow my IG stories regularly you know that this was all accomplished just prior to the initial exposures of testosterone to US lifters but likely right around the time when some eastern European lifters were first using it. I had the pleasure and fortune of meeting Tommy Kono at a seminar in Sacramento California where he critiqued my lifting in 2012 just 4 years before he died in 2016 at the age of 85.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjk7w8Ch...n-by=helms3dmj


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I unfortunately made a mistake in my initial post highlighting some of the most famous strong women of old. Athleta (1, 4 & 5) and Athelda (2 & 3) are two separate, yet equally impressive people. I incorrectly thought they were one in the same.

Athelda, born Frances Rheinlander in Manchester England was 170 cm tall (5’7) and 75 kg (165lbs). Athelda performed in the decade of 1910s in various music halls in England but was reported to have made her debut in Buenos Aires in December 1911. She was also known as the miniature Lady Hercules and Britain’s Beautiful Daughter. Her performances began with posing highlighting her muscularity and included lifting a dumbbell in various positions. She was considered one of the strongest women of her era, and could lift a 50lbs weight off the floor with just her pinky. She had an ongoing rivalry with another famous strong woman Vulcana, and there are reports of competitions between the two with mixed outcomes, some reporting Vulcana winning others Athelda.

The Belgian born Athleta Van Huffelen began her career at age 18 in 1886, preceding the career of Athelda as she retired in 1908 3 years before her debut. Van Huffelen demonstrated her strength by lifting people, horses and barrels, bending horseshoes and spikes, and by wrestling other strong women. She also performed traditional weightlifting movements in front of crowds and was one of the strongest women at that time bent pressing 204lbs, lifting 190lbs in the two arms jerk, and 113lbs in the one arm snatch. She was also very muscular with 16.7 inch arms by her retirement.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BjS3nLtB...n-by=helms3dmj


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George Hackenshmidt was a world renowned championship wrestler, strongman and physique enthusiast in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. He invented the hack squat, not the machine but the actual barbell movement of doing a deadlift standing in front of the bar, and also influenced the creation of the bench press as he popularised floor pressing. In his day he set overhead lifting records in the single arm and double arm overhead press and Jerk, overhead pressing 275lbs in his prime and defeating Eugene Sandow in an impromptu single arm overhead contest for a pair of slacks.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BipxdMcB...n-by=helms3dmj


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Alan Mead (top left): an early 1900’s physical culturist, Alan lost one leg below the knee cap during WW1 and in response took up weight training. He became renowned for his development, vascularity and ability to isolate and flex the muscles of his body. He also was one of the first to develop and train with cables and the modern lat pulldown is supposedly modelled off his work.

Siegmund Klein (top right): you may remember him from my last post, this is a picture of him about a decade later in the 1930’s showing his lean and muscular physique. He would remain an icon for decades, keeping up his strength and physique into his 70’s.

John Terry (bottom): as a featherweight at 132lbs Terry would be the first African American to take the platform and represent the US in Olympic weightlifting at the 1936 Olympic Games. Incredibly, outside of Olympic weightlifting he had arguably the best pound for pound deadlift, at just over 600lbs/272.5kg at 132lbs/60kg, since Herman Goerner’s 793lbs/350kg deadlift at 220lbs/100kg.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BiX0hBFB...n-by=helms3dmj


Cita:


T.W. Clarke (top left): shown here in 1933, he was the 11 stone (154lbs) British Amateur weightlifting champion in 1913 and the 12 stone (168lbs) British Amateur weightlifting champion in 1914. He was also a well known physique performer who as you can see, had incredible arm development.

John Grimek (right): a legend of the iron game. He competed in both weightlifting and bodybuilding in the 1930’s and 1940’s and was undefeated in bodybuilding and was one of the first Mr America’s. He also competed in the 1936 Olympics on the US weightlifting team where he was among the lighter heavyweights (82.5kg+ at the time) and he pressed 253lbs!

Siegmund Klein (bottom left): another legend of the iron game from the early 1900’s, Sig began training as a teenager in 1919, was a disciple of Maxick and by the mid 1930’s was a well known strongman and physique performer. Shown here in the 1920’s, he was able to overhead press 221lbs at a bodyweight of 147lbs! He also opened and managed on of the first Barbell based gyms considered by many the Mecca of training in New York.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BiSaJzWB...n-by=helms3dmj


Cita:


Pictures Circa 1936 - born around 1906 Kenneth Pendleton lived most of his life in New Jersey and in the mid-1930s his photographs began to appear in the muscle magazines of the day. Kenneth was only 51" tall (note: I’m starting to think he was 5’1 I can only find one source claiming 51 inches and another athlete is mentioned in the same article as 51 inches who I know is 5’1 so I think it’s a typo) and weighed 132 pounds but had 15 inch arms which were huge on his smaller frame. At his time he was considered one of the most muscular men since Maxick and reporters and photographers alike remarked on his “anatomy chart” like muscularity.

In February 1941 Kenneth won the most muscular physique at the Mr. New York City contest. This was the highest award that any African American bodybuilder had earned by that time. Shortly after he won this trophy, the United States entered World War II, and Kenneth was drafted into the Army. He had a short career after the war before stepping out of the limelight.
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bh4pVfSh...n-by=helms3dmj


Cita:


Left to right, top to bottom (all from 1890s-1920’s): Eugene Sandow, Herman Goerner deadlifting 360kg/793lbs at 100kg/220lbs, then 4 shots of Bobby Pandour (Wladyslaw Kurcharczyk), and finally Ernest Cadine.

Insane stuff, given Herman’s deadlift would place him among the top ~3 deadlifters of the IPF in the 105 division today while being 5kg under the class limit AND given there was only 1/7th the worlds population at that time! Also insane considering Bobby Pandour achieved such muscularity while walking around in contest condition all the time, primarily WITHOUT LIFTING WEIGHTS. You heard that right, dude did some very light dumbbell training but primarily did bodyweight work, hand balancing etc and lifted/carried his brother around to train/perform.
Incredible stuff at least a decade before the word testosterone was even invented in 1935 then another 1-2 decades before steroids were being used by strength and physique athletes.

What’s my point? It should alarm you if your immediate reaction is “roids!” when you see a “questionable” physique or an insane feat of strength displayed by someone claiming natural...not because you might be falsely disparaging a fellow human being who has achieved something inspiring (although this is true as well), but rather because that immediate thought should be an alarm bell for you. Your knee jerk dismissal of something amazing (“bbc genetics”, “not natty”, “filter and photoshop”, “fake plates”) should concern you. Part of that might be you needing to make your own accomplishments “okay” by downplaying others. Even when you’re right, this knee jerk reaction should alarm you. If no worthwhile feats exist without genetics you don’t have, drugs you don't take or without deception, part of you is protecting your feelings because maybe you don’t think you can accomplish anything comparable. I get it, we’re human, I’ve done it too. But, that belief and fear is holding you back from whatever your potential might be. Are there fake natties? Of course! I’m not saying you shouldn’t be skeptical. But skepticism is NOT jumping to a conclusion. When you do, use it as a reminder to look inward and make a change so you can progress
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bgwa0Vyh...n-by=helms3dmj

Última edición por posavasos; 23-Aug-2018 a las 14:25
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 14:53   #2
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Qué sería del floro sin posi..... Gracias posi!!

Menudos rodales tiene el negro.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 15:08   #3
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Eso no son rodales, es un rodapié.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 17:18   #4
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Interesante.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 17:40   #5
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A ver si con este hilo la gente abre la mente y se da cuenta que el límite natural es bastante superior a lo que se piensa, sobretodo para los dotados genéticamente, que manda cojones lo bajo que están las espectativa nattys.

El primero es impresionante. Las porras de Herman Goerner también impresionantes. La segunda, la mujer, buff...
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 18:18   #6
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Ami personalmente esos físicos no me gustan... pero es verdad que las caras se ven sanas...

En el culturismo de hoy en día (que me flipan los físicos) las caras denotan agotamiento, desgaste, etc...

Obviamente, el punto es diferente.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 18:26   #7
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Firmaba hasta por el más flaco de esos.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 18:44   #8
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Iniciado por peKerMaN Ver Mensaje
A ver si con este hilo la gente abre la mente y se da cuenta que el límite natural es bastante superior a lo que se piensa, sobretodo para los dotados genéticamente, que manda cojones lo bajo que están las espectativa nattys.

El primero es impresionante. Las porras de Herman Goerner también impresionantes. La segunda, la mujer, buff...
Cagonto Peker a ver si te enteras que habemos flacospalososasquerosos que por mucho que hagamos lo mas a lo que podemos aspirar es a parecer golfistas con suerte llegar casi a pesar como el dogo del brother de Guti

Broma brother.. estoy seguro que dedicandole 100% los flacomierdas podriamos ser un pelín menos flacomierdas, el caso es que coincido 100% con simmetry, y natty no le veo sentido dedicarle 100% a las pesas a no ser que se sea un dotado genético de los de verdad.. ya ni hablar si encima tienes genetica flacopalo.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 18:57   #9
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Ami personalmente esos físicos no me gustan... pero es verdad que las caras se ven sanas...

En el culturismo de hoy en día (que me flipan los físicos) las caras denotan agotamiento, desgaste, etc...

Obviamente, el punto es diferente.
¿El del 1º tampoco? Me parece increible un físico natty así, más aún en 1930. Es impresionante. Mis dies y mis veintes.
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Antiguo 23-Aug-2018, 21:30   #10
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Me parece un hilo 5 estrellas.

Gracias Posi.
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